Barker-Ewing Scenic Float Trips in Grand Teton National Park

Book Your Scenic Float Trip in Grand Teton National Park

When you’re looking for things to do in Jackson Hole, your first stop should be Barker-Ewing Scenic Float Trips. Book a raft trip with us, and you’ll be rafting with Jackson Hole’s best!

Our original 10-mile Snake River Scenic Float Trips operate wholly within Grand Teton National Park. Wild nature surrounds you on these river rafting trips. You’ll float beneath the Grand Tetons in an area untouched by human development for generations. And Barker-Ewing’s experienced river guides will share fascinating information on:

  • The unique history of Grand Teton National Park and Jackson Hole
  • The geology and ecology of the pristine Snake River environment
  • The abundant wildlife in our valley and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

The Snake River headwaters are a part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers system. Barker-Ewing is honored to be rafting the only stretch of the Snake River in Jackson Hole to be officially designated as “scenic”.

Our high level of safety and customer satisfaction supports our reputation as the Best in Jackson Hole. Barker-Ewing Scenic Float Trips is proud to have been awarded Trip Advisor’s Certificate of Excellence every year since 2012.

 

Wapiti Wilderness

Barker-Ewing, Environment, Jackson Hole, Rafting, Wildlife

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Olaus_and_Mardy_MurieI grew up in Jackson Hole in the shadow of the Tetons, and spent vast stretches of my childhood wandering the wapiti wilderness. I waded through Ditch Creek, explored the caves and crags on Blacktail Butte, and rode my little horse for miles across sagebrush flats. Lucky for me, my neighborhood north of town was also home to some of the most famous naturalists and anthropologists of the time: the Craigheads, whose decade-long study of Grizzlies in Yellowstone pioneered advances in wildlife ecology and conservation; the Laubins, who studied the lifeways of the Plains Indians and wrote several famous books about tipis, dances and archery; and Mardy Murie, considered by many to be the founder of the modern conservation movement; all lived within a couple of miles of my house, and were as much a part of my childhood landscape as the mountains themselves. Continue reading…