Barker-Ewing Scenic Float Trips in Grand Teton National Park

Book Your 2015 Trip Now

Our on-line reservations are open 24/7 so you can book your 2015 scenic float trip at any time. Our winter office hours are a bit hit or miss (depending on current weather conditions here in Grand Teton National Park), but weather dependent, we plan to be open Mondays-Fridays from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm MST. Pam is happy to take your call and schedule your scenic float trip if you prefer. We start floating again on May 14, 2015 so book today!

Book Your Scenic Float Trip in Grand Teton National Park

When you’re looking for “Things to Do in Jackson Hole”, consider booking a raft trip with Barker-Ewing Scenic Float Trips, you’ll be rafting with Jackson Hole’s best!

Our original 10-mile Snake River Scenic Float Trips operate wholly within Grand Teton National Park. Wild nature surrounds you on these river rafting trips, floating beneath the Grand Tetons in an area untouched by human development for generations. Barker-Ewing’s experienced river guides offer extensive information on:

  • Grand Teton National Park and Jackson Hole geology
  • Animals and their habitats
  • Jackson Hole and Grand Teton National Park history

Snake River headwaters are a part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Barker-Ewing is honored to be rafting the only stretch of the Snake River in Jackson Hole, designated as “scenic”.

Our high level of safety and customer satisfaction supports our reputation as the Best in Jackson Hole.

Birds of Jackson Hole

Barker-Ewing, Environment, Jackson Hole, Wildlife

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Black Capped Chickadee on a snow bank.A respectful “hats off” to the multitude of birds and animals that stick it out in frigid Jackson Hole for our long, long winters. And some of Grand Teton National Park’s heartiest winter residents are also the cutest. The chickadee has stick-to-it-iveness and cuteness in spades!

Here in Jackson Hole we have two varieties of chickadee: we enjoy seeing both Black-Capped and Mountain Chickadees on our forest ski trails, by our suburban feeders, and along the Snake River.

During the summer months it’s easy to hear the chickadee’s distinctive call, a two-tone whistle that sounds a bit like “fee bee.” It is easy to imitate, even for a novice whistler like myself, and I used the “fee bee” whistle for years to call the kids in from the yard, or locate them in a crowded store.

Mike Y., who guided for Barker-Ewing all through 70s and 80s, used the “fee bee” to communicate with his young daughter, too. One day, while she sat patiently waiting for daddy to return to the boathouse, a flock of chickadees flew overhead with a chorus of “fee bee” whistles. That little girl jumped up and ran off down the driveway, yelling “Daddy, where are you?” Poor thing: her daddy was still an hour away on the river! It took quite a bit of explaining when we brought her back to the boathouse: she thought that “fee bee” was her dad’s distinctive call, and didn’t realize that he had appropriated it from a chickadee. Continue reading…