Barker-Ewing Scenic Float Trips in Grand Teton National Park

Show us your stuff! Enter our First Annual Wildlife Photo Contest.

The Last of the Great Wild Places book cover, Tom MangelsenOur Scenic Float trips are unbelievably photogenic. Here’s your chance to show off your fantastic photos from a float trip and have the chance to win a signed copy of world-renowned nature photographer Tom Mangelsen’s latest book. You could also see your photo(s) featured on our website or brochure! Here’s how to enter….

Book Your Scenic Float Trip in Grand Teton National Park

When you’re looking for “Things to Do in Jackson Hole”, consider booking a raft trip with Barker-Ewing Scenic Float Trips, you’ll be rafting with Jackson Hole’s best!

Our original 10-mile Snake River Scenic Float Trips operate wholly within Grand Teton National Park. Wild nature surrounds you on these river rafting trips, floating beneath the Grand Tetons in an area untouched by human development for generations. Barker-Ewing’s experienced river guides offer extensive information on:

  • Grand Teton National Park and Jackson Hole geology
  • Animals and their habitats
  • Jackson Hole and Grand Teton National Park history

Snake River headwaters are a part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Barker-Ewing is honored to be rafting the only stretch of the Snake River in Jackson Hole, designated as “scenic”.

Our high level of safety and customer satisfaction supports our reputation as the Best in Jackson Hole.

Grand Teton National Park: The park that almost wasn’t

History, Wildlife

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Grand Teton National ParkIn addition to seeing amazing wildlife and stunning views, one of the things our guests always comment on about our scenic float trips is how much they learn from our guides about the history, geology and botany of the Park. So we thought we’d spend some time in our next few blog posts sharing a little about those things. Today it’s history.

We are incredibly lucky to have Grand Teton National Park. The formation of the park was one of the longest, most bitterly fought of all American conservation battles. It took 50 years and three separate governmental acts (holy cow!) whereas Yellowstone (the nation’s and the world’s first national park) took only two years from idea to reality.

The early years of Grand Teton National Park

As early as 1897, several proposals suggested expanding Yellowstone’s boundaries southward to encompass portions of northern Jackson Hole and protect migrating elk herds as well as including the Teton Range and northern Jackson Hole. Neither the Department of the Interior nor Congress acted on these early proposals. A small version of today’s park was eventually established in 1929, protecting the major peaks of the Teton Range and six glacial lakes at the base of the mountains. But much of the valley of Jackson Hole remained in private ownership so conservationists decided to seek private funds to purchase land in the Jackson Hole valley. …continue reading Grand Teton National Park: The park that almost wasn’t