Barker-Ewing Scenic Float Trips in Grand Teton National Park

Book Your Scenic Float Trip in Grand Teton National Park

When you’re looking for things to do in Jackson Hole, your first stop should be Barker-Ewing Scenic Float Trips. Book a raft trip with us, and you’ll be rafting with Jackson Hole’s best! Our high level of safety and customer satisfaction supports our reputation as the Best in Jackson Hole. Barker-Ewing Scenic Float Trips is proud to have been awarded Trip Advisor’s Certificate of Excellence every year since 2012.

TripAdvisorOur original 10-mile Snake River Scenic Float Trips operate wholly within Grand Teton National Park. Wild nature surrounds you on these river rafting trips. You’ll float beneath the Grand Tetons in an area untouched by human development for generations. And Barker-Ewing’s experienced river guides will share fascinating information on:

  • The unique history of Grand Teton National Park and Jackson Hole
  • The geology and ecology of the pristine Snake River environment
  • The abundant wildlife in our valley and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

The Snake River headwaters are a part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers system. Barker-Ewing is honored to be rafting the only stretch of the Snake River in Jackson Hole to be officially designated as “scenic”.

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Enter our Wildlife and Landscape Photo Contest and WIN!

Have you taken one of our scenic float trips in Grand Teton National Park? Did you catch a great shot of an animal or a beautiful landscape?

Share them with us in our Photo Contest for a chance to have your photo featured on our website or our brochure, or win a signed copy of world-renowned nature photographer Tom Mangelsen’s latest book, The Last Great Wild Places.
 

Magical Mustelids

Environment, Jackson Hole, Wildlife

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Grand Teton National Park is home to many types of small mammals, including the Magical Mustelids. This family of fearless carnivores includes badgers, fishers, martens, mink, river otters, wolverines, and three weasels: the least weasel, the long-tailed weasel, and the short-tailed weasel or ermine.

A nice brown coat for summer.

The short-tailed weasel measures between 7 and 13 inches including the tail, and despite their diminutive size, they really believe themselves to be quite tough. I remember one little guy I saw while hiking with some clients along the river – he bravely held the trail against four much-larger mammals, and would not let us pass. It turns out the weasel symbolizes courage in many Native American cultures. Even though they are small and only weigh up to 12 ounces they will readily attack larger animals. They are effective hunters, preying mostly on mice and voles. (Researchers rely on the presence of weasels as an indicator of an abundant rodent population.) They are also terrific climbers, so our avian friends are not immune to their predatory survival strategies.

How does the little short-tailed weasel survive the long cold winters in Jackson Hole? Food, shelter, and companionship are critical. With their long bodies, low weight, and lack of body fat, weasels have some distinct disadvantages during the long winter months. They must keep warm by eating up to 40 percent of their weight every day, and may occasionally engage in “killing sprees” so that they can storing leftovers as a hedge against days without any kills. They use up a lot of energy during a hunting day, covering as many as three miles in their quest for prey. How does the Small-tailed weasel negotiate the winter landscape? Continue reading…